Try Out the Harvard Elevator Pitch Builder

harvardpitchbuilder_small

The other day, I wrote about how to brainstorm and build the perfect elevator speech in five steps. Another tool you should try when creating the perfect pitch is using the Harvard Business School’s Elevator Pitch Builder.

The online tool will help you select effective words to describe yourself, walk you through creating your who, what, why, and a goal. And then it gets better: It’ll analyze your pitch for you with stats like how many seconds it will take you to present the speech.
harvardpitchbuilder450px

This is what my elevator speech looks like after running it through the Pitch Builder:

I’m an Internal Communications Specialist with 12 years of experience in the field of communication. I write the blog Communicate (Your) Skills which cover how to improve your communication skills in all areas related to yourself, your community and your professional life. I’m determined to uncover the secrets of how successful people and companies communicate. The blog serves as a knowledge bank on how to communicate your way to success. I’m sure this is a topic of great interest to professional people who are trying to succeed both in work and personal life.  I’m currently preparing for a special series featuring interviews and guest posts by successful people telling others how they communicate their particular skills. I would be very pleased if you would like to contribute on the blog with a post telling how you communicate your skills.

My pitch is 138 words long and will take 35 seconds to deliver. I also got an auto-generated tip that says I should be careful not to turn it into a memorized monologue. After all, the pitch is designed to start a conversation, not delivering a sermon.

Create your elevator speech today

You’ll never know when you’ll need an elevator pitch. Perhaps you meet someone important already tomorrow. And you don’t want to stand speechless, do you?

I’d really like to read your elevator pitch after you’ve created it in the Pitch Builder. Please share your new pitch in the comment box below!

What readers tweet about this article:

About the author

Anna Rydne is an award winning and highly skilled communications specialist with +13 years of experience in the field of internal and external communication, PR and marketing. What distinguishes her from others in her field of expertise is that she treats communication as entertainment. It's simple to explain why: if it isn't funny or relevant enough, people switch channel. Anna has a special interest in personal branding and she believes the road to success is trying. Based in Stockholm, Sweden, she's determined to uncover the secrets of how successful people and companies communicate. She tweets about all things comms, social media and marketing @CoSkills and writes for SteamFeed.com once a month. She holds a bachelor's degree in psychology. Contact her at communicateskills@gmail.com.

9 Responses to Try Out the Harvard Elevator Pitch Builder

  1. Cathye Ross says:

    Reblogged this on and commented:
    Amazing Anna is spot on again.

  2. Thanks for the info Anna! I ‘ll definitely try this one! :)

  3. Thanks for sharing your pitch, Anna.

    I was very surprised (when I counted) that there are 50% more “you/your” occurrences than there are of “I” in it. I’d bet that’s because all but 1 sentence starts with “I” (and the other starts with “The blog”), so it SEEMS not to take any interest in the audience (even though it actually DOES, as my count confirmed).

    For a different angle, you might also like this 3-sentence pitch outline that starts with the word “you”. It also asks a rhetorical question that tends to get the listener agreeing with your ideas, and it focuses on what you can do to solve a problem your listener has. Would love to hear your thoughts on it.

    Again, thanks for sharing your links and ideas.

  4. [...] A tool you should try when creating the perfect pitch is using the Harvard Business School’s Elevator Pitch Builder. The online tool will walk you through creating your pitch. And then it gets better.  [...]

Speak your mind!

Loading...
Sign up for notifications of new posts and you'll get the newsletter too!
(I promise not to spam your inbox).
%d bloggers like this: